US Reaches H1-B Visa Limit On First Day

Each year, we’ve reached the cap of H1-B visa applications earlier and earlier. This year, we have met (and nearly doubled) the cap on the very first day the application process is open.

US reaches visa cap, skilled workers out of luck

Technology companies may face a shortage of skilled workers later this year after U.S. immigration services reached its annual quota for visa applications in one day.

“Clearly there is a need for science and engineering talent in this country that is not being met by home-grown talent,” said William Morin, director of government affairs for Applied Materials Inc., the world’s biggest supplier of equipment for making microchips.

“These are people who are going to develop the next big thing, and you’re driving people offshore. It boggles the mind that we would come to this point,” Morin said.

The Citizenship and Immigration Services received a record of more than 150,000 applications for the H-1B visa on Monday, nearly double the number of visas it can grant for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2007.

Individuals cannot apply for the visa. The employer must apply or submit a petition on the worker’s behalf. The visa is good for up to six years.

I’m a big proponent of immigration, but I can at least understand some of the arguments about importing other countries’ poor people. I disagree with it, but I understand it. Either way, those arguments clearly don’t apply here.

These individuals aren’t going to show up first, and start looking for work later. They’ve got jobs lined up. And we’re not talking about sub-minimum wage, off-the-books cash work. We’re talking about college graduates who will be working in jobs well above the median household income in this country. Many are young, single, and high-income, which makes them an absolutely huge source of tax revenues for the government. As the article points out, we’re talking about the people who are going to come here and make our economy stronger, which will make all of our lives better.

And yet we keep them out. What’s going to happen? Well, it’s pretty simple. Faced with these restrictions, faced with the high corporate tax burden, high regulatory burden, and the already-high cost of employing skilled workers in a country with such a high standard of living, these companies are going to outsource. While I’m also not against outsourcing as a natural phenomenon, I think our government shouldn’t be using public policy to encourage it.

It doesn’t take an economist or an engineer to tell you that importing smart people is good policy. But then, when has our government ever followed good policy?

FacebookGoogle+RedditStumbleUponEmailWordPressShare
  • http://thelibertypapers.org/2005/11/22/a-bit-about-kevin/ Kevin

    Faced with these restrictions, faced with the high corporate tax burden, high regulatory burden, and the already-high cost of employing skilled workers in a country with such a high standard of living, these companies are going to outsource.

    Maybe the Lou Dobbs, Pat Buchanan, Lew Rockwell, Ron Paul, Tom Tancredo and other protectionists should think about before they rant and rave against H1-B Visas.

    While there are many and good arguments in support of immigration restrictions for unskilled labor; restricting skilled immigration simply doesn’t make sense.

  • http://hathor-sekhmet.blogspot.com VRB

    For you young people out there, there is no shortage of science and engineering talent in this country. It is just that the talent is not under forty, cheap and inexperienced. If you get to be my age and think you are valuable and you can’t give away your talent, think about the statistics and lies you have bought all of your life.

  • aa

    So most so-called talented US workers are over forty, demand 100k+, and own mainly outdated skills. Who wanna hire them? Get real!

  • T W

    This idea that H1 drive slalries down is a myth…

    Do not forget that with a H1 you can switch companies. So if you arrive in California and realize that you make 20% less than everybody you just quit…

    The shortage is a reality, 150k applications the first day… unemployment is low…

    Bill Gates should go back to the congress and say ‘ok, I can not make these skilled workers come, I will relocate this R&D center in India… ” It is that simple.

    Everybody talks about IT but in Finance, NY is now behind London on many standards (salaries, number of deals…). To me, it is because many young Europeans no longer want to deal with US immigration, and London offices can just hire them easily…

    USA does not want smart people anymore… (the H1 quota used to be above 200K in 2000/2001)… it might end up costly in the long run.

  • R H

    H1 visa holders are very reluctant to switch companies. The company is the sponsor for the worker’s visa, so the worker is not going to want to restart the greencard application process somewhere else. Thus, companies can pay a lower wage to these people, because there is no threat of the worker leaving.

    If the US is truly short of this kind of talent, then why not make the industry more attractive for college students to pursue, thus increasing the percentage of qualified applicants? I doubt there is ever a shortage of people who apply for business school or law school, because those are well respected industries to be working in.

  • http://unrepentantindividual.com/ Brad Warbiany

    RH,

    What, you don’t think engineers are well-respected? It’s one of the most highly-paid careers for new college grads. It’s not a matter of attractiveness. Even though starting salaries for a 22-year old new college grad are typically higher than America’s median household income, do you really think many American students coming out of today’s high schools want to deal with multivariate calculus, thermodynamics, and transmission line theory?

    One of the things I was going to point out when I wrote this post was the idea that unless we fix America’s educational system in general, we don’t have a chance at providing people capable of doing these jobs from within our own borders. Fix the educational system, and we might have a shot. But right now most kids coming out of high schools can barely count, so I don’t think we can expect them to do a triple integral of a function to find the solution to a Maxwell equation…

  • http://hathor-sekhmet.blogspot.com VRB

    Brad,
    but are you using those theories?

    aa, not much has changed over time in any of those subjects Brad has mentioned, except perhaps the introduction of the computer which has made life a lot easier for engineers and scientist.

  • http://unrepentantindividual.com/ Brad Warbiany

    I’m not using much of the high-level math. Very few people– outside of the PhD folks– really are.

  • Baz L

    As one of these H1-B applicants in limbo here let me shed a little bit a light on this whole situation for you guys.

    1st of let me tell you that I detest ILLEGAL immigration and that is a matter that should be addressed.

    That being said, I paid a hell of a lot of money to come up here and go to school for 3 years. While in school, we’re limited to working 20 hours a week on campus. I would have gladly taken up a part time position at McDonalds to help with tuition, rent and all the other stuff. The argument is that we shouldn’t be working, that we’re here to study. But how many people have a full ride to college and can get by with no work? Fine. I did that, as hard as it was.

    After you graduate it’s hard enough to get a job out of college with NO work experience period (immigrant or citizen). We have the added burden that some employees simply do not hire you because of your visa status. They don’t do H1B’s and don’t want to go through the hassle or the paperwork. It costs them money and it costs me money.

    Now after all that struggle, I’m finally blessed enough to get a company that is willing to go through the H1B process and then I get this news. Needless to say, today is not my day.

    H1B workers pay taxes, rent apartments, buy houses, buy cars, and in every other way contribute to the economy. We’re not talking about mass employment at McDonalds here, I’m in IT.

    So it’s not that jobs are being outsourced. I’m here. I went to school here, got my grades here, have proven myself here. Shouldn’t I be entitled to work here?

  • dev

    Tp Baz L,
    I could not agree with you more. great post.

  • http://www.microsoft.com Steve Cavage

    Baz L,

    When you came to the US to study you came on a Student VISA, right? Well a student VISA entitles you to just that, being a student. The fact that you could work for 20 hours was nothing but GENROSITY from the US government.Once the Student VISA is over, you are welcome to get back in line with other H1B applicants to get a job. If you think that the fact that you were educated in the US should entitle you to something, well, there is a special category for Highly educated people who have studied IN THE US to get an H1B. Highly educated in this context means a PHD. So, get a PHD and you will not be lumped with the rest of the crowd. Getting just a BS and and MS does NOT entitle you to anything. If you think that the fact that you got some education in the US entitles you to anything, then how about people BORN IN US who claim that they are entitled to American jobs and not foreigners? By your “entitlement reasoning”, people born in America have a much more right and entitlement over those jobs, but I am sure you would change your “entitlement reasoning” if they scrapped the H1B program would you not? Finally, and I am sure every single student applying for an F1 Visa knows this already, a student VISA is a Non-immigrant VISA. If you tell the US consular officer in your country that you intend to work in the US after your student VISA is over, your application will be summarily rejected. If you look at the bigger picture, you are one of the millions from your country who had the money to come over to the US and get an education, now if that would entitle you to anything, it would be discriminating against people educated in YOUR country who are as well as, or maybe better qualified than you but did not have the money to study in the US but want to work on the H1B Visa all the same. Now, you would not want the US government to discriminate against people depending on how much money they have for studying, would you?

    This sort of reasoning and logic makes me laugh out loud at the people who make them and being a hiring Manager at MS, I make sure such candidates are weeded out in the early stages.

  • katy

    We have already lost manufacturing to China and I’m sure if the current situation continues we will soon lose IT, Business & finance services industry to India

  • Ashish

    I’m a Masters student form India and I’m fully agreed with MR. STEVE Only US citizens have the right to get the American jobs and we should be thankful for their generosity, that they allowed as to study at their universities. The entire concept of non-immigrant workers is based on the notion of mutual benefit not on some kind of entitlement to work. If the citizens of America dose not see any benefit to have you hear than you should go back home.

    It is really ridicules to try to find a job at a place where you are unwanted, its way better to go home where you are wanted. We came here to study, Why not to go back now and contribute to the success of our own country and use all of so called high skills and education, hard work and innovation to make our own country competitive. If we are right about our high skills, education and hard work [as we all think and claim] than we can do the same things at home and, money and success will follow as like an afterthought [remember fittest survive]. And if we are reluctant to do that than I have to say we are not all that competitive. If that is the case why are we worried about H1B visa lets apply for un-skilled worker visa [a lot of them are available] and clean the roads. Shame on you guys, don’t trouble your American friends be thankful to them. Last but not the least, remember It’s their country not yours and they have right to get the best job here not you.

  • http://thelibertypapers.org/2005/11/22/a-bit-about-kevin/ Kevin

    We have already lost manufacturing to China and I’m sure if the current situation continues we will soon lose IT, Business & finance services industry to India

    Katy, why are we losing industries to foreign countries?

  • http://packetguy.blogspot.com Packetguy

    Very well put, Ashish. I hope more Indians think like you. Best of Luck!

  • Kishore

    Dear Ashish,

    I myself am one of the 150000 people who have applied for a H1b this year and now stand a 1 in 3 chance of ‘making it to the US’. I am currently gainfully employed at an Indian software firm in Hyderabad, couple of years back I was a engg. Student nobody here.

    My main motive to go to the US is simple – money. Working in the US as a Peoplesoft pro I can reasonably expect to SAVE about $25000 a year. To put this in to perspective my salary after tax here is about $400 a month, still a lot of money by Indian standards – a hundred dollars goes a way here. A few years in the US and I can get myself an apartment back in India before I head back with ‘International work EX’ to boot.

    I completely agree with you on both counts – if the US does not want me they have every right to reject me, I should be grateful to them and we young Indians owe a lot to our country, if we don’t build India who will? But the thing to remember is that they need us as much as we need them. I provide a service they need and they pay me for it. In the globalized economy, labor is a commodity that can be moved and traded like any thing else.

  • Prasad

    Steve,

    I really wonder about your true credentials (u say uare a MS hiring manager u mean the widows company?) especially given ur ignorance about international students with PhDs. I am one of those, working in a very selective area, with MS and PhD degress from a top 15 school, and the work I do advances the state-of-the-art design flows in the chip industry. And yes, I get to use all the advanced math I learnt. But still I need a H1B visa as a first step before I can apply for my green card. Yes, I do believe that I’m different from the run-of-the-mill H1B worker from other countries as the work I do is important for the company and the US industry as a whole. I believe that the visa fraud being pepetrated by Body shoppers as well the big 3 from India should be duly investigated, so that the genuine workers like me will have a fair chance.

  • meh

    Students who work 20 hours a week on campus end up putting their money right back in for tuition and board. It’s the same situation non-foreigners deal with while in school. We’re all poor students and we all try to scrap up money for education, whether it’s through loans, scholarships, or work.

    You know what’s the hard part is? It’s not the work you put in to get the degree, but the rejection from companies who can’t even look at the work you’ve done because you weren’t born in America, so they can’t hire you permanently.

    Honestly, I’m glad that the cap was reached. If it hadn’t, I would’ve been stuck in the thought process that I /have/ to stay here in America; if I don’t it proves I didn’t do as well as my classmates in school. Now, I’m excited about the possibility of moving to a different country. I’m more than happy to not invest my youthful years stuck here in America, hoping my company will sponsor me.

  • Ben

    Those who are screaming for an increase in H1B quota are making this noise for the greedy corporations.

    I am from India and currently an h1b worker. My parents were people living middle class lives in India. I worked hard all through my school years working 16 hrs or so every day and finally graduated with million other hard working kids like me. Then I worked in India for 4 years. So when a ‘Indian consultant in USA’ offered me 37K to work in America, I gladly took the offer. Later I realised that they had to ‘let go’ the american guy who used to do my current job and used to make a 100K, because of ‘funding’ problems. Now I see a lot of american contractors who are in line to be rolled over due to ‘funding’ problems.

    So the bottom line, as I understand, is that there is such huge demand for h1b workers only bcos these are people who would work for dirt cheap rates. I shouldnt be complaining about the whole thing. But I am scared that if you allow 200,000 cheap labor into this country every year, it would push down the salaries even further down.(bcos there is no cap on greed)

    Also, just try putting some real provisions to ensure the minimum wage requirements…u would see that all this cry for ‘real talent’ would stop in a minute and the total number of h1b applications wont meet even the current cap.

  • Raghu

    I am one of the 150,000 candidates for this year’s H1-B quota. I read that there is a 20,000 extra cap for those who have earned a US-Master degree or Higher. I have earned a US-Master degree few years ago from a reputed US university. The only difference is this degree is earned under a distant learning program, and I never traveled to USA for studies. I have earned this US-Master degree while I was working from India. Will my application be considered in one of those 20,000 special quota applications? Or is this 20,000 extra cap is for the students that are pursuing US-Master degrees physically in USA? Or my employer has to resubmit my H1-B application specifically for this qutoa?

  • http://www.thelibertypapers.org/ Adam Selene

    Raghu,

    First, there is another visa type for candidates that have advanced skills, rather than an H1-B. You may qualify for that, talk to your employer. Second, I don’t know the regulations well enough on H1-B to know what needs to happen.

    I do know that a couple of years ago I brought an employee from the Netherlands with a Master’s Degree earned from an accredited Dutch institution without an issue. I think it just matters whether the institution you got your degree from is accredited, not where it is or whether it was distance learning, or not. In fact, your credentials probably don’t say “distance learning” on them, so how would anyone know?

  • Pankaj

    Hi,
    I am very much worried that i will be able to get H1 visa this time or not .One of the empoyer fo US have filed visa for me .But now because lot of application ,lottery system will be applied .
    Please help me to get H1 Visa

    Pankaj

  • AmericanLibertarian

    Dear Kevin,

    I find it ironic that you lash out at a group of people (Lou Dobbs and others) who more than anyone else in the American public eye seem to be advocates of Liberty and the philosophy of the founding fathers. They truly seem to be the only ones that have actually read the Constitution and Bill of Rights, and still hold onto the idea of the US as a country, and not as the center of a Globalist Empire.

    Could this just be a case of you nit-picking those who are too close to you in ideals? Why must those who seem to be libertarians continually attack each other?

    Why not pick on the Globalists, Oligarchists, or those who use the Bill of Rights like toilet paper?

    Peace out, Lib-Bro

  • Ben

    To Mr. Steve Cavage and everyone else attacking foreign students trying to get H1-B:

    “Well a student VISA entitles you to just that, being a student.”

    That is correct.

    “The fact that you could work for 20 hours was nothing but GENROSITY from the US government”

    Is that really? Well, then I guess the 20 hours that International Students spent on helping other college students is how we show our gratitude sir. (btw it’s GENEROSITY)

    “Once the Student VISA is over, you are welcome to get back in line with other H1B applicants to get a job.”

    Sorry I’m thinking out loud here but I’m starting to doubt if you really are a “manager”, well … maybe you are.

    “If you think that the fact that you were educated in the US should entitle you to something, well, there is a special category for Highly educated people who have studied IN THE US to get an H1B. Highly educated in this context means a PHD. So, get a PHD and you will not be lumped with the rest of the crowd. Getting just a BS and and MS does NOT entitle you to anything.”

    The term “specialty occupation” means an occupation that requires:
    (A) theoretical and practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge, and
    (B) attainment of a bachelor’s or higher degree in the specific specialty (or its equivalent) as a minimum for entry into the occupation in the United States.
    … (from USCIS.gov)

    “F1 Visa knows this already, a student VISA is a Non-immigrant VISA. If you tell the US consular officer in your country that you intend to work in the US after your student VISA is over, your application will be summarily rejected.”

    Now I think you’re just plain dumb. The decision whether they approve your student visa is based on whether or not you really are going to study, already accepted in a university and able to pay tuition or just planning to go to US to work ILLEGALLY. To work in US you need to apply another type of Visa (again you need to be accepted/hired first). Getting approved for F1 visa does not mean you will get an H1 visa after graduation. Just so you know … H1 is also a Non-immigrant visa. You might’ve mistaken H1 with Green Card (immigrant visa) who obviously love PhDs and definitely make it easier for them to get it. They deserve it.

    “If you look at the bigger picture, you are one of the millions from your country who had the money to come over to the US and get an education, now if that would entitle you to anything, it would be discriminating against people educated in YOUR country who are as well as, or maybe better qualified than you but did not have the money to study in the US but want to work on the H1B Visa all the same. Now, you would not want the US government to discriminate against people depending on how much money they have for studying, would you?”

    First, what bigger picture??? Second, every nation discriminates to some degree. Some have laws to make it difficult or less apparent but discrimination unfortunately still exists. Deal with it. Third, millions of them don’t have the money to come to US. It’s called “scholarship” and “financial aid.” US, Japan, Singapore and other countries offer those. Educations are also free in some countries. They have options on where to go. The ones that have money to come all the way to US usually don’t stay here long because their families probably own businesses and most of them go back after college.

    Do you have Asians (I mean real Asians who didn’t grow up here) in your classes? Have you heard people saying that “Asians are smart, diligent, etc.” Well those are just 1% or maybe even 0.1% from the population who decided to study here in US (most are the best and smartest students or at least better than average) so you see you can’t really compare that to average student population here. It also means only a few percentage of students here can compete with them. Is it fair that they get A’s and you don’t? Is it fair they get a job and you don’t? Is it fair to American citizens that they have to compete with foreign workers? What about foreign students? Is it fair Harvard, Princeton, or NYU hire those Asians and not you. You were born here in US right … so don’t you have more right to get into US universities than those Asians who weren’t born here? OK let’s go back to work issue.

    Kishore mentioned a good point here: “In the globalize economy, labor is a commodity that can be moved and traded like anything else.”

    That being said, America is NOT the only nation recruiting foreign workers. Meaning, they’re also competing with other nations when hiring the best. Rather than complaining how “I lost my job to foreign workers.” What about doing something that will make YOU more desirable to US employers. Besides, citizens have more options: You can get security clearance. Foreign workers can’t. Agreed this is though time for EVERYONE. Unemployment rates are high and it’s not easy to get a job. But trust me … it’s harder for those F1 students to get a job after college here. It’s like twice if not 3 times harder for my international friends I’d say. That was last year. I’d say it’s like 3×4 harder this year.

    Sorry for the long talk … OK let me just get to the point here.

    In short, nations compete, states compete, cities compete, companies compete, universities compete, workers compete, students compete.

    I’m not saying all F1 students are best students and going to be better workers. I’m not saying they have more rights than citizens. I’m not saying it’s fair. I’m simply saying they have every right to COMPETE with all of you. That’s it. COMPETE.

    “This sort of reasoning and logic makes me laugh out loud at the people who make them and being a hiring Manager at MS, I make sure such candidates are weeded out in the early stages.”

    Now I am 99% positive you are not a manager. If you are, then congratulations you’ve managed to fool them.

    Btw, I’m a web application developer on H1 visa and I just have BS in Computer Science. I graduated about 2 years ago. My H1 friends and I make around $65k now. Some of my American friends make more … some less. We get along fine.

  • http://www.microsoft.com Rahul Sharma

    Prasad,

    Are you seriously a Phd holder? I am asking because you do not know that the flagship product of Microsft is “Windows”, not “widows”. “Widow” is a word used to refer to a woman whose husband has died. However, I see South Indians like you with piss poor English skills all around me here in Microsoft and it makes me really ashamed of that fact. Secondly, are you really so dense? You do not even realize that Mr. Cavage wrote thatt there is a special category for PhD holders, but he never said that they do not have to apply for H1B. You just assumed he was saying that did you not, and why, one may ask. Reading your reply makes it immediataley Obvious, you are thinking of the Green Card and itching to write about it without even completely reading the reply. I am sure that you are not even a graduate, leave alone a PhD. If you are a graduate, then you must be from the Famous Osmania University which hands out the degree to anyone for 500 Rupees. Anyhow, Mr. Cavage is a very well known personality here at Microsoft Redmond Campus. He is one of the senior people in the HR department and is responsible for bringing over hundreds of Indian Engineers over to the US every year. So next time, do not act like a retard and use google before everyone understands your true idiocy.

  • http://thelibertypapers.org/2005/11/22/a-bit-about-kevin/ Kevin

    American”Libertarian”:

    I find it ironic that you lash out at a group of people (Lou Dobbs and others) who more than anyone else in the American public eye seem to be advocates of Liberty and the philosophy of the founding fathers.

    Since when has tariffs and immigration restrictions, especially on skilled labor, been consistent with liberty?

  • Ben

    where did my comment go?

  • http://unrepentantindividual.com/ Brad Warbiany

    Ben,

    I just checked the spam filter, and it was found in there… I’ve approved it, so it has now shown up above. I’m not sure why it was flagged as spam, though.

  • tarran

    Kevin,

    I think americanlibertarian is thinking of the Mercantilist wing of the founding fathers who were decidedly illiberal: guys like Madison and Hamilton.

    The idea that most of the founding fathers were libertarians is laughable. A case may be made for Jefferson and some of the other Anti-Federalists being libertarian (although their tolerance of slavery I think fatally undermines any argument to that effect). Additionally, even Hamilton despite his love of tax and spend government seems libertarian today when compared to the mainstream of political thought, mainly because he underestimated how much government intervention the public would tolerate.

    However, in the end, the government we have today is the logical result of the government Hamilton called for. There is no way one can consider Alexander Hamilton a libertarian. Mercantilism, whether the 18th century variety or the 21th century variety remains inherently unlibertarian.

  • Baz L

    Mr. Steve sir. Interesting comments. I can almost see the spit flying out of your mouth as you say those words. You need to calm down.

    Let me just clarify a few things. First of all, I can only speak for MYSELF. I’ve never been to India and don’t know what the economy is like back there.

    In my country, the demand for the particular skills that I’ve studied is not that high, therefore it makes more sense to be here.

    About the government and the “GENEROSITY”. I understand there are rules and regulations for something. However, how many of us (Non-residents and residents) have enough money to “go to school” and just that? Because I’m not from a well off family means that I shouldn’t be able to get an education if I can’t pay cash for it up front?

    This line “So, get a PHD and you will not be lumped with the rest of the crowd” was also a bit amusing. Again this comes back to the fact that these things cost money Steve. I guess being blessed and working at Microsoft doesn’t allow you to understand certain things that other people go through. To get a PHD I need some starter money. I need to pay off loans, these things cost money. Which is the entire point of the H1B application. Buy myself a couple years to pay some bills then get back into school.

    To cut long story short. I would like to modify my last statement, since that’s what seems to have gotten you all heat. You’re right I should not be entitled to work here, on that you are correct. However I do feel that I should be entitled to a CHANCE to work here. You are trying to paint the “lazy immigrant” picture here where it does not apply. I’ve worked hard and for that I feel a chance is little to ask. And 65/150+ doesn’t seem to be a fair chance.

    But, such is life. I do take comfort in knowing that arrogance and closed mindedness such as yours is not shared by all citizens of this country.

    P.S. On another note. I believe that more regulations need to be taken with respect to alternative methods of staying in this country. I guess I should just get pregnant (Kind of hard with no female organs) then sit here and get welfare? Or maybe I should just front a nice young lady some money and have a pretend marriage. Then I would be here for good.

    Why does the RIGHT and moral way to do something always seem to be the one with most resistance?

  • http://www.microsoft.com/ Rahul Sharma

    This is Steve :p posing as Rahul

  • A. Shirley

    To Steve Cavage

    I just want to say a simple word, shame on you as an American, are you afraid to compete with those foreign workers? You said you are a manager, but after I read your comment, I think you need to get fired ASAP! Don’t you know that our logo (in Microsoft) is “Pride in diversity” ?

    Regarding to money spent during college years, Mr Steve, do you ever heard a full scholarship for a student who is not wealthy enough but has the ability to win in the competitive application pool? this is would also apply how HR department recruit people, am I right Mr Steve? You need to be eligible in the competitive pool to be accepted in the company. Can Microsoft survive until now if it is only based on nationality but not quality?, what can you offer to us is the most important thing, not your passport!

    Rahul Sharma, do you really know him in Microsoft at Redmond Campus? I think you just made that up, don’t you?

    Also, I think, foreigners have the right to work here in US the same as US citizens that work in foreign country. Think about that!

    best,
    A. Shirley

  • Ben

    Brad, thanks for putting my previous comment back. can u check spam filter again.

  • Keshav

    H1-b Cap contains 65000 + 20000. Who are these 20000 reserved for ? If they are for candidates who earned US-MS or US-PHD degrees, do these candidates need to be under F1 VISA currently?

  • http://siddu.com Sid

    Hey man,
    Is there any sign of increasing h1b for this year..If so when they will announce it..

  • http://none AmericanLibertarian

    Kevin and Tarran,

    The “Founding Fathers” libertarian-like ideology I spoke of was more in line with Jefferson, Madison, Patrick Henry (Anti-Federalists), and to a certain extent George Washington.

    Hamilton would be the opposition to them(Federalist, non-libertarian, mercantilist, elitist, global corporate oligarchist).

    I agree with Tarran, the State of the Union is that the Hamilton philosophy was clearly the winner. We are a Hamilton styled state, that only pays lip service to true libertarian ideals.

    If we can agree that Hamilton represents corporate greed, and that Jefferson represents libertarian values, one could ask the question, which one of the two would support exploitation of the working class? Which would support massive importation of cheap labor to depress wages?

    Obviously, Hamilton would support it, and Jefferson would be against it.

    The Liberty that Jefferson wanted was freedom from massive central government, and from oppressive mercantilism.

    We should not be fooled when the false libertarian Oligarchists claim they support liberty, when they really want to oppress the lesser classes. The only liberty they really want is to pay you nothing, and to hold all of the cards. Power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely. Opposition to concentrated power is part of libertarianism.

    Don’t be fooled when the richest men in the world claim that their exploitation of labor is “libertarian” or liberal. Their motivation should be transparent.

    Jefferson would enjoy Lou Dobbs, and he would vote for Ron Paul.

    And don’t forget, tarrifs were Jefferson’s ideal method for funding the government. Our current income tax system is another Hamilton inspired travesty…

  • http://www.thelibertypapers.org/2006/11/22/comrades-i-hereby-declare-the-revolution/ Adam Selene

    Defense of large corporations just because they are not government entities is not “libertarian” or “liberal”. On the other hand, opposing large corporations reflexively because they represent concentrations of power is not “libertarian” or “liberal” either. Classic Liberalism is characterized by a commitment to individual liberty, limited government and rational thinking.

    Other than that observation AL, I agree with your comment.

  • http://none AmericanLibertarian

    Adam wrote:

    > Defense of large corporations just because they are not government entities is not “libertarian” or “liberal”.

  • AmericanLibertarian

    Thanks Adam. You said it better than I did. While I hear that at some “protests” there is reflexive opposition to big corporations, I am more exposed to the reflexive defense of big corporations, under the guise of libertarianism. In cable tv, our Jefferson vs. Hamilton battle may be continuing in the polar opposites we see in Lou Dobbs vs. Larry Kudlow. They don’t mention each other, but they somewhat represent the old sides.

  • http://www.thelibertypapers.org/2006/11/22/comrades-i-hereby-declare-the-revolution/ Adam Selene

    I should point out that there is nothing inherently wrong with a large corporation in classic liberal thinking. There’s nothing inherently right or privileged about it either.

  • ziv wolf

    hello i applied for h1-b visa on time (april 1)
    when will i know if i was lucky???

    sincerly
    ziv wolf