Thoughts, essays, and writings on Liberty. Written by the heirs of Patrick Henry.

“A man is none the less a slave because he is allowed to choose a new master once in a term of years.”     Lysander Spooner

April 6, 2008

A Timely Reminder

by Chris

No matter what you think of John McCain, everything said in that video is entirely true and correct; and people should remember that whilst … I’ll be charitable and call it arguing… about politics for the next 7 months… and for the next forever for that matter.

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12 Comments

  1. [...] Chris @ The Liberty Papers   [...]

    Pingback by Below The Beltway » Blog Archive » Something I Can Actually Agree With John McCain About — April 6, 2008 @ 12:12 pm
  2. except for that fact that mccain’s sincerity and character deserves no respect whatsoever. and in my opinion, not even respect as a veteran, seeing as how he is focused on continuing me and my community toward doom.

    Comment by oilnwater — April 6, 2008 @ 1:16 pm
  3. If Bob Barr’s in the race, I see absolutely no reason to vote for McCain. McCain’s advocating the same foreign policy as Bush, and while he might be slightly better on economics than Dubya he’s just as bad or worse on civil liberties. No thanks.

    I also found the “disagreements among friends” angle to be rather condescending.

    Comment by UCrawford — April 6, 2008 @ 6:41 pm
  4. McCain would be a slight improvement on civil liberties, I think, actually. At least he’s pretty vehemently against torture (although he’s backed down from that stance at times for political considerations). As much as his “National Greatness” conservatism appalls me, its emphasis on “honor” tends to work strongly against the “ends justify the means” logic that has so typified the Bush Presidency.
    I actually think he would be worse than Bush on economic issues, though. Sure he would likely curtail pork, but we forget that what he calls “pork” (as opposed to what libertarians would call pork) is a minute portion of the federal budget. And although he would probably make a genuine (but ultimately terribly unsuccessful) effort to balance the federal budget, let’s not forget that we’d probably see a continued increase in the cost of our foreign policy and defense budget. Most importantly, though, McCain has long shown a willingness to interfere with business that would make even GWB blush.
    Bottom line: McCain would be a significant improvement over Bush on civil liberties, as bad or slightly worse on economic issues, and equally bad on foreign policy issues. Which would make him a slight improvement overall.
    Final side note. Andrew Sullivan has a link today that shows that 61% of historians rank GWB as the worst Prez ever – even worse than longtime crown-holder James Buchanan. Of course, most of these historians also rank FDR as one of the greats due to their irrational love for the New Deal and for abuse of executive power when it’s done to further liberal policies.

    Comment by Mark — April 6, 2008 @ 7:17 pm
  5. Mark,

    He gives speeches about the evils of torture, but he was still in favor of the Military Commissions Act of 2006…therefore his opposition to torture appears to be only in theory. Also, he was the author of McCain-Feingold, which was nothing more than an attempt to make it more difficult to unseat incumbents in elections. And he’s a rampant anti-drug warrior, despite the fact that his wife is an addict (who also received preferential treatment from the government when she got caught). By those three examples alone, he’s a clear detriment our to civil liberties.

    I believe he’ll be better than Bush on economics mainly because he seems supportive of free trade and more open immigration. It’s still not enough to make me want to vote for him, mainly because he’s in favor of those things because he seems to believe it will help a big government be more efficient.

    Pass…especially since Bob Barr appears to be an option now.

    Comment by UCrawford — April 6, 2008 @ 9:08 pm
  6. Believe me, McCain is far, far from an option for me, as I’ve made pretty clear in the past. But GWB has set the bar for abuse of civil liberties at a level that someone with even a below-average sense of decency could reach. His opposition to torture, while weak, has at least been more than token. At least when he thought he could oppose it without paying a political price.

    Anywho, there is one thing you said where I have to actually (gasp!) defend Bush: immigration. On that issue, it’s always seemed to me that he and McCain have been in lockstep. (Which makes sense since they’re both border-state Republicans, which I discuss at length here: http://publiusendures.blogspot.com/2008/04/they-took-ur-jerbs.html)(completely shameless self-plug). Neither of the two have gone as far as I would like on that issue, but they both tried to go as far as the political climate would allow. As it turned out, even that half-measure was defeated by the xenophobes. In fact, it probably cost Bush more hardcore GOP support than any other issue.
    I will now return to my normal Bush-bashing.

    Comment by Mark — April 6, 2008 @ 11:10 pm
  7. Mark,

    In fact, it probably cost Bush more hardcore GOP support than any other issue.

    Not really…Bush didn’t start harping on immigration reform until after the Republicans lost Congress. After that, he just used it as a tool to bash Democrats (same with his health care proposal). Bush may or may not think more open borders are a good thing, but he certainly didn’t care enough about them to reform immigration when he had a friendly Congress…and the “anti-terror” measures that he’s put in place during his administration have done as much to drive away foreign investment, tourism, and legal immigrants as anything.

    Seriously, besides giving empty speeches about how important immigrants are, what has Bush ever actually done to make this country more accessible to them?

    Comment by UCrawford — April 7, 2008 @ 5:06 am
  8. LOL…After it faded out at the end, the Voice should have piped back up with a quick reminder…

    “Just don’t spend more than $2300.00 donating to your candidate for the cause of rational engagement or debate, otherwise we might have to Black bag your Ass…”

    Add that last refrain in and that would be a perfect Mccain Ad…

    Comment by ka1igu1a — April 7, 2008 @ 6:08 am
  9. Fair enough, although it’s worth noting that the strongest opposition to immigrant-friendly immigration reform has been coming from the GOP the last decade or so; by pushing for the guest worker program and whatnot at a time when Dems were ascendent, Bush was probably taking advantage of the only chance he had to get a decent reform bill through. There was never any party discipline on immigration, where Bush’s relatively immigrant-friendly views were in the distinct minority.

    On a somewhat related note, people tend not to understand just how devastating his anti-terror policies on things like passports have been/will be to the cross-border economy in places like already-depressed Buffalo. IIRC (may be wrong), Condi Rice did what she could to fight it behind the scenes, but the rest of the Bushies just steamrolled it through.

    Comment by Mark — April 7, 2008 @ 7:02 am
  10. Mark,

    although it’s worth noting that the strongest opposition to immigrant-friendly immigration reform has been coming from the GOP the last decade or so; by pushing for the guest worker program and whatnot at a time when Dems were ascendent

    Democrats oppose immigration mainly because unions oppose immigration and traditionally that’s one of the Dems’ biggest contributors. There wasn’t a chance in hell that immigration reform was going to go through with the Dems in charge and Bush knew it.

    And considering that Bush pushed through several bills that went against Republican doctrine, I don’t buy that he couldn’t have gotten them to sign off on immigration if he’d really been behind it. Instead he chose to focus his efforts on bills to bribe voters.

    On a somewhat related note, people tend not to understand just how devastating his anti-terror policies on things like passports have been/will be to the cross-border economy in places like already-depressed Buffalo.

    I agree with you there. Just saw an article yesterday about Arizona’s crackdown on illegal immigration and how it’s making their state’s economic slowdown even worse. Unsurprisingly, one of the big movers behind the crackdown was our old buddy, Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who’s never let individual rights or the economic welfare of his constituents get in the way of his political grandstanding.

    Honestly, the rabid anti-immigration folks just make me sick.

    Comment by UCrawford — April 7, 2008 @ 7:12 am
  11. The relationship between unions and immigrants is a bit more complex than you’re giving it credit for. While they’re universally extremely protective on trade issues, they are quite split on immigration. Keep in mind that immigrants now make up a huge chunk of their membership in the service and agriculture industries and that union membership has been declining for decades. To the extent new immigrants are able to join unions, they are often more than willing to welcome them. If you look at Obama’s position on immigration, you’ll notice that it’s been rather popular with the Dem grassroots (though not so popular with white blue collar workers, but that’s another story altogether). Somewhere in the mid-90′s, the parties passed each other on the immigration issue. It’s still a somewhat divisive issue within each party, but Dems are definitely now more pro-immigration than Republicans.

    Comment by Mark — April 7, 2008 @ 8:43 am
  12. I would respect McSame’s words more if I hadn’t actually been watching what he has been doing, and not doing, over the past 20 years.

    Comment by MikeF — April 9, 2008 @ 5:46 pm

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