Thoughts, essays, and writings on Liberty. Written by the heirs of Patrick Henry.

“This is the fruit of free labor. It is able to create more wealth for everyone than slave labor once provided for the masters.”     Ludwig von Mises,    Liberalism

July 27, 2012

Taxpayers made that happen

by Quincy

By now, everyone has heard Barack Obama’s “you didn’t build that” line:

If you were successful, somebody along the line gave you some help. There was a great teacher somewhere in your life. Somebody helped to create this unbelievable American system that we have that allowed you to thrive. Somebody invested in roads and bridges. If you’ve got a business. you didn’t build that. Somebody else made that happen. The Internet didn’t get invented on its own. Government research created the Internet so that all the companies could make money off the Internet.

That quote? It’s fiction. There is no mythical “somebody else”. There is no class of people separate from entrepreneurs and workers who created those things. The political elite would claim otherwise, as Obama does. They claim they built those and we owe them fealty for that.

The truth is obvious. That government? Those public works? They didn’t build those. That research? They didn’t fund that. Taxpayers made that happen.

TrackBack URI: http://www.thelibertypapers.org/2012/07/27/taxpayers-made-that-happen/trackback/
Read more posts from
• • •

1 Comment

  1. This quote from Obama is as revealing as it is infuriating. Who built the political career of Barack Obama? Did he build his career or did his friends in the Chicago political machine?

    While I do believe Barack Obama is a great speaker who articulates his point of view very well, I can’t help but think he is a product of affirmative action. This is speculation on my part but until he releases his transcripts or answer his critics as to how he became the editor of the Harvard Law Review without writing a single article, what else am I to conclude?

    Then once he got into the political arena, what were his big accomplishments in the state legislature that propelled him into the U.S. Senate? More than anything else, it was the sex scandal of the man who held the seat that forced him to not seek another term. With Obama going up against the pathetic carpetbagger Alan Keyes, Obama was a shoe in to win the senate seat.

    Once in the U.S. Senate, Obama mostly voted “present” (that is when he actually was present at his job when he wasn’t running for president). With such a short and unremarkable career in the Senate, how does he make the gigantic leap to win the nomination and ultimately the presidency? Again, I believe affirmative action played a vital role. The Democratic primary in 2008 was by far his biggest obstacle, particularly Hillary Clinton. Hillary Clinton had her gender on her side as “something different” from the old white male who has always held the office of president. Obama had the edge, however; because Hillary Clinton by this time had long been a polarizing figure in politics and part of the Democrat Party establishment. Obama represented a “change” from the Bush-Clinton-Bush-Clinton phenomenon that seemed to be emerging. Obama was a better speaker and was more likeable than Hillary. Once Obama started winning one primary after the other, this was too much even for the Clinton machine to handle.

    The final test, the general election, wasn’t much of a challenge IMO. I believe that after 8 years of Bush and the housing bubble bursting, that in 2008 any Democrat could have beat any Republican. Now add to this the prospect of making history by electing the first black president (well, half black but good enough for the history books) vs. another old white male who didn’t even excite the base of his own party…I would have been shocked if there was a different result.

    Obama probably believes successful businessmen “didn’t build that” is because his experience is that others did the heavy lifting for him.

    Comment by Stephen Littau — July 30, 2012 @ 10:54 am

Comments RSS

Subscribe without commenting

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Powered by: WordPress • Template by: Eric • Banner #1, #3, #4 by Stephen Macklin • Banner #2 by Mark RaynerXML