Thoughts, essays, and writings on Liberty. Written by the heirs of Patrick Henry.

April 20, 2009

Buy This Book — Your Stomach Will Thank You

All,

Co-blogger Chris just announced a new cookbook that he and his wife are putting together, heavily based upon a number of recipes that he’s posted on his blog. I still haven’t managed to go and enjoy any of said cooking on my trips into the Phoenix area, but I can say that based on the recipes I’ve seen him post — I’m looking forward to it.

Since the book hasn’t been released yet, I can’t offer any definitive comments. But I can tell you that I’m not expecting The French Chef; rather something more along the lines of 1,001 Ways to Cook Large Dead Animals. Either way, I expect to see a lot of tasty offerings.

Chris mentions that since it will be a limited print run, the best option is to pre-order for a book that will be officially available sometime in the next month or so. You might want to jump on this one quickly. Head on over and take a look.
(more…)

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 9:18 pm || Permalink || Comments (3) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Book Reviews,The Contributors
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April 15, 2009

A Refresher on Philosophy

In comments I have been asked to explain further my philosophies of liberty, government etc…

I’ve written extensively on the subject before, both here, and on my personal blog; and when I say extensively I’m talking tens of thousands of words; so I thought I just post some of the more comprehensive and important links here:

My Philosophy:

  1. What the Heck is a Muscular Minarchist?
  2. The Politics of Liberty
  3. Rights Penumbras and Emanation
  4. Citizen or Subject?
  5. No Philosophy?
  6. The Fundamental Problem with Involuntary Collectivists
  7. Authoritarian, Libertarian, Anarchist?
  8. -isms Part One
  9. A Couple of Sad Truths
  10. To Amy, and Others who Believe that Government can do Good
  11. I Can’t Bleieve I haven’t Explicitly Stated this Here Before
  12. Differing First Principles

Read them all and you’ll get a pretty solid idea of the philosophical, moral, and practical underpinnings for the ideas I present here.

Posted By: Chris @ 9:54 am || Permalink || Comments Off || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors,Theory and Ideas
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Stephen Gordon On Rachel Maddow

As Jason noted last night, our own Stephen Gordon appeared on Rachel Maddow’s show last night discussing the rift between conservatives and libertarians over the Tea Party’s.

Here’s the video:

Visit msnbc.com for Breaking News, World News, and News about the Economy

UPDATE: Huffpo on Gordon’s appearance here. HotAir here. Raw Story here. Maddow fan site here.

Posted By: Doug Mataconis @ 6:40 am || Permalink || Comments (6) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Activism,Politics,Taxation,The Contributors,Theory and Ideas
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April 13, 2009

The Tax Day Coalition

A lot of digital ink has been spilled on these pages over the tax day “Tea Party” protests. Not all of it has been supportive, but I think there’s to some extent a need to clear the air and explain our position. Granted, this is a group blog and I can’t quite speak for everyone here, but we’ve had some backroom discussions so hopefully I’ll give a general enough overview.

The Liberty Papers has signed up to be a part of the Tax Day Coalition.

There are a lot of conflicting thoughts about this. There is some concern over whether the Tea Party has been co-opted by the type of folks who had no problem with the big spending of the Republicans over the last 8 years, and only seem to have that “come to Jesus” moment when they realize that it’s the opponents who are holding the purse strings. To some extent, of course, the levels of spending we’re seeing are a pretty significant expansion on those of the Bush administration, and many of those on the Right applauded his big war spending and national security spending, and forgave the NCLB and Medicare Part D spending as politically necessary to keep “the agenda” moving forward.

Either way, we see a large group of people opposed to high taxes and high spending. And that’s a good thing. The art of politics is knowing where coalitions can be formed, and making use of them. We see the populist appeal of this movement, and we see this as the tangible reaction of a group of people who have been betrayed by their own party but were too internally conflicted to organize resistance until they were out of power. They’ve come back to the correct side of the debate now, so it’s a good idea to work together rather than fight them out of a libertarian purity purge.

The Liberty Papers has been fighting against this taxation and spending since we formed this blog in 2005. We’re not joining the Tax Day Coalition, we’re excited that the Tax Day Coalition is joining US.

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 9:35 pm || Permalink || Comments (3) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Activism,Fiscal Policy,Taxation,The Contributors
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February 28, 2009

Contributor Jason Pye On Fox News

Congrats to my fellow blogger Jason Pye, who was selected for a roundtable discussion on Neal Cavuto’s show on Fox News. Jason was one of the “Tea Party” protesters in Atlanta. Good job!

Cavuto was somewhat flippant about the limited nature of these protests. I sincerely hope that future protests grow, because this is an issue too important to be dismissed as a “tiny minority” viewpoint.

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 9:07 am || Permalink || Comments (1) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Strategies For Advancing Liberty,Taxation,The Contributors
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February 6, 2009

1,000,000

Early this morning, The Liberty Papers recorded our millionth unique visitor. A visitor from Terre Haute, Indiana. I’ve got fond memories of Terre Haute; from a mardi gras party at Rose-Hulman [I attended Purdue, but visited a friend there] and a visiting Indiana State coed… But that’s a story for another time.

The Liberty Papers was started in November 2005, just over three years ago. In the interim, we’ve written almost 3,000 posts, had nearly 27,000 comments, and the blog has grown from a little outpost on the libertarian frontier to at least a midsized suburb around the libertarian center of action.

I’d like to thank the contributors of this blog, both past and present, for everything they’ve done to make this site what it is today. I’d also like to thank the regular readers and commenters for helping to make this a conversation. Finally, of course, I’d like to thank the founder of the site, Eric, for having the thought to create The Liberty Papers in the first place.

Where are we headed in the future? I’m not sure that the roadmap is clear, but I do know that we’re kicking around ideas. We’d like to see The Liberty Papers ascend to become a more regular stop for those who appreciate liberty, as well as a site where our political opponents are welcomed for cordial debate. We’ll continue to work hard at what we do, and to try to expand the scope with new ideas and new contributors over time, and hope that one day The Liberty Papers will move out of the ‘burbs and into a mid-town high-rise.

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 8:05 am || Permalink || Comments (3) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Admin,The Contributors
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January 14, 2009

Fanning Freedom’s Flames

Thanks to Brad and the rest of the folks here for affording me the honor of writing at a website which I’ve read nearly daily for years. Hopefully, I’ll be able to make some contributions to what I consider a really good blog.

As I am frequently involved in a wide range of political activities, my hope is to be able to provide a bit of inside scoop about the people, events, legislation, organizations, etc. with which I’m involved.  In the meantime, I’ll try to provide my two cents about current events and how they relate to the freedom movement.

My political philosophy:  I’m as opposed to bailouts of the automobile industry today as I would have been to a bailout of the buggy and carriage industry some 110 years ago.  I’m a military veteran opposed to any form of involuntary national service.  I’m a sports fan opposed to government-funded sports stadiums and arenas , or any federal meddling with the NCAA Bowl Championship Series.  I enjoy a fine cigar and feel restaurant owners should have the right to determine smoking practices within their own business premises.   Of course, I’d feel the same way even if I didn’t enjoy cigars.

The law should apply equally to all, but we would certainly benefit if we eliminated a significant portion of current laws from the books.

In other words, I don’t want the government in my wallet, my bedroom…   …or my holster.

While I write at several other websites about other topics, my goal is to help fan the flames of freedom at The Liberty Papers.  I hope you’ll enjoy the ride as much as I probably will.

You can also find me on Facebook and Twitter.

Posted By: Stephen Gordon @ 3:29 pm || Permalink || Comments (3) || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
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Administrative Notes

Two main things:

1. I’ve changed the “Contributors” blogroll to make a distinction between currently active contributors, and those who (for whatever reason) no longer have the time or inclination to post on a regular basis. This is part of a wider effort, to become a little bit more consistent in our output… Which brings me to:

2. Welcome Stephen Gordon, the newest contributor to The Liberty Papers. Stephen has a long history with the libertarian movement, but I’ll let him speak for himself when he puts an introductory post up in the next few days.

We’re working internally on finding ways to improve The Liberty Papers in a more general sense, and we hope to become a bigger force for liberty in the future. As always, if you have suggestions, I’m happy to take them.

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 12:00 am || Permalink || Comments Off || TrackBack URI || Categories: Admin,The Contributors
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October 13, 2008

Personal Attack Ad…Against Myself!

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be on the receiving end of a personal attack ad? I have. During the 2006 campaign, I thought it would be fun to write my own personal attack ad…against myself! Like many attack ads, everything I wrote about myself was (is) technically true but lacked context (the full context of each charge can be found by following the links).

I found the exercise to be very cathartic and enjoyable. I highly recommend you try it sometime! Feel free to write your own personal attack ad against yourself or write your own against me in the comments section of this post.

Now, cue the unflattering grainy black and white video with dreary music and enjoy my personal attack ad:

Who is Stephen Littau and why can’t we trust him?

For starters, he often advocates ending the war on drugs, suspending drug raids on suspected dealers, and repealing mandatory minimum sentencing laws for drug offenders. He has even gone as far as to defend a man who shot and killed a police officer who was simply serving a lawful search warrant.

But that’s not all…

Stephen Littau once wrote “Go ahead and call me an infidel, I will readily embrace this label” and that “an end of faith is way overdue.” Do we really want to put our trust in such a Godless heathen?

Not if you want to defend marriage, the flag, and traditional family values. Stephen Littau opposed the Defense of Marriage Amendment and the Flag Desecration Amendment. He also wants to take God off our currency, out of the Pledge of Allegiance, and remove religious monuments such as the Ten Commandments from government property using the tired old “wall of church and state” argument.

Stephen Littau is so morally depraved that he considers selfishness a “virtue” and wants to eliminate social welfare and entitlement programs leaving Americans to fend for themselves. Stephen Littau wants us to believe that such selfish attitudes are actually compassionate by allowing people to suffer from their poor choices.

Let’s be sure not to suffer from this bad choice. This November, send Stephen Littau a clear message:

Yes to the war on drugs!
Yes to religion in government!
Yes to defending marriage, the flag, and the Ten Commandments!
Yes to a compassionate government!
And No to the secular philosophy and dangerous ideas of Stephen Littau!

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October 2, 2008

Off Topic — New Snack Treat Becomes Available


Hey, folks, as most of you know (or can tell), there are no ads on this site. It’s not something that we as contributors are expecting to make income from, and in all honesty, I want it to remain as non-commercial as possible.

However, my wife and her sister have just launched a brand new business, and I wanted to give them some publicity. They sell nationwide, and I know we have a decent readership from all across the nation. I’m posting it here and hope you enjoy it, but rest assured, this is not going to become a regular occurrence here. Without further ado, I give you:

Krispy Dips!

I’ll let their description cover it for you:

A Krispy Dip is the grown-up version of the crispy marshmallow treat you loved as a kid.

We start with our signature recipe for the original “Krispy” square made from real imported Madagascar vanilla, creamery butter and the gooiest marshmallows we could find. Each hand-crafted square is then dipped in the finest chocolate and topped with an array of decadent toppings including rich caramel, real espresso beans, sweet coconut and roasted nuts.

Customer satisfaction is of the utmost importance to us. Every order is dipped then shipped to ensure quality and freshness. We are dedicated to providing a superior product that you will come back to again and again. So come dip into delicious!

They’ve worked very hard to create a truly unique and elegant product. For those of you looking for new gift ideas for friends and family over the holidays, you won’t be disappointed. And for anyone who either owns a small business or sends out corporate gifts to thank important clients, they can customize the packaging to give it the personal touch. They’ve already been involved in a wedding, a baby shower, have provided Dips for an LA Dodgers function, and will be doing a major function later this month with another SoCal sports team. For SoCal residents, they’re working towards entry into local gourmet markets.

And last, but most certainly not least, they taste great. If anyone happens to be a fan of dark chocolate and espresso, the espresso bean flavor is my favorite. I don’t have much of a sweet tooth, and that one blows me away!

So head on over and give it a look. It truly is a new and refined twist on a familiar treat, and it’s sure to please!

And now, back to your regularly-scheduled programming…

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 4:30 am || Permalink || Comments (3) || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
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May 21, 2008

The Liberty Papers to Cover the National Convention in Denver

The Libertarian Convention of course! Which convention did you think I was talking about? The Libertarian National Convention will run this Memorial Day weekend beginning on Thursday, May 22nd and ending on Monday, May 26th. I plan on attending the convention representing The Liberty Papers as a citizen journalist on Saturday, Sunday, and possibly Monday.

My press pass will give me the same access as the MSM outlets (though some events will be reserved for “invited media only”). The events which I believe I will be able to get into include the platform debate, the presidential debate, national chairs debate, presidential nominating speeches, presidential election roll call with acceptance speech, the first press conference with the LP Presidential Nominee, and much, much more.

Fellow Liberty Papers contributor Jason Pye will also be attending the convention as a delegate.

Usually, The Liberty Papers does not have a great deal of activity on the weekends as far as posts are concerned but this weekend will be much different. Expect periodic reporting from the convention beginning Saturday. I’m going to try to score some high profile interviews, will post lots of photos, and possibly post some video for your consumption.

It’s my goal to bring the convention to The Liberty Papers’ reader. Any suggestions for what you would like me to cover, who I interview, and what questions you would like me to ask would be greatly appreciated!

**UPDATE** Jason Pye will also be adding content to The Liberty Papers throughout the weekend:

I am taking a video camera and a laptop and will be updating daily both here and The Liberty Papers. You may even see a post or two over at Red State.

There will be a few battles between moderates and anarchists, mainly over the platform and Bob Barr. Over a beer not too long ago, I told Daniel Adams, chairman of the Libertarian Party of Georgia, that I expected a walkout of different factions at some point during the convention.

Pye has much more insight to the inner workings of the Libertarian Party than I do, so I think his take on the event will be very interesting. Between the two of us, I think we will have the convention covered quite well.

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January 23, 2008

Quincy’s Back!

Back in the early days of The Liberty Papers, one of the founding contributors was Quincy. Life interceded into his desire to blog, and he eventually took an unspecified hiatus from the blogosphere.

Thankfully, he’s back!

Head on over and see what he’s up to.

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 8:04 pm || Permalink || Comments (1) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Blog Discussions,Blogroll,The Contributors
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November 22, 2007

Have A Great Thanksgiving!

Life should be slightly quiet here over the next few days, as a couple of us may be attending to familial obligations. In the interim, we wish you and yours a happy holiday, and we’ll get back to battling the evil forces of government after the turkey hangover subsides!

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 6:00 am || Permalink || Comments (1) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Admin,The Contributors
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November 10, 2007

The Georgia Porkbuster

Fellow Liberty Papers Contributor Jason Pye is featured in a report from WSB-TV in Atlanta on the fight against pork in the Peach State:

Way to go Jason !

Posted By: Doug Mataconis @ 7:09 am || Permalink || Comments Off || TrackBack URI || Categories: Government Waste,The Contributors
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November 5, 2007

Monday Open Thread — Hard Cases Edition

Doug recently posted a “Libertarian Hard Cases” thread about how to deal with issues related to children. Libertarianism is one of the few political systems that treats adults like adults and holds them responsible for their actions; it assumes that people are rational actors who are capable of making decisions in their own life and deserve rights commensurate with that ability. But it has difficulty answering questions regarding people who are not capable of making those decisions and cannot be trusted with the rights to do so, such as children and the mentally disabled.

Undoubtedly, there are many other libertarian hard cases. So this thread is a call to the readers here to give us ideas. What libertarian “hard cases” would you like to see addressed?

For example, I’ll be writing a post soon regarding the rights of parents to choose to vaccinate or not vaccinate children. There are two clear questions that arise:

1) As a parent, do I have the right to not vaccinate, which is a choice that some would consider tantamount to abuse or neglect of a child, if I believe that the potential harm of a vaccine is worse than the disease it is preventing against (such as chicken pox)?
2) Does society as a whole have a legitimate claim to supersede my right to choose not to vaccinate, as it creates an externality that increases the likelihood that we see an outbreak of vaccine-preventable diseases?

These are difficult questions, and ones that I think may result in disagreements within the contributors here, so it could lead to some interesting fireworks. If you have any suggested topics, let us know.

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 7:53 am || Permalink || Comments (13) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Blog Discussions,Open Thread,The Contributors
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October 8, 2007

A Little Bit About UCrawford

I suppose the best way to describe myself would be to say that I have a problem with authority. I’ve always disliked when people told me what to do, even as a young child, and I’ve always preferred to find my own path through life and make my own decisions, even if it occasionally went against the conventional wisdom and sometimes worked to my short-term disadvantage. My dad said I inherited it from him, but that I’ve taken it to a whole new level. When I was young I wanted to be a journalist, until I got to college and realized that journalism was less about the search for objective truth than it was about writing the stories that best suited your employer’s interests, whether they were true or not (which didn’t sit well with me at all). So I drifted aimlessly through a couple of years of college as an indifferent (often drunk) student, unsure of what to do with myself until one of my fraternity brothers gave me a copy of “The Fountainhead” and I got hooked on the ideas that success and a refusal to conform to societal standards were not mutally exclusive, and that the greatest evil in the world was society and government’s failure to recognize or accept individuality and individual freedom as a strength, not a weakness. So I threw myself into studying politics and history, worked in a few political campaigns after college, had some success, and thought about doing a career in politics until I realized that most of the people I knew who had never had a career outside of politics had no comprehension of how the real world actually worked and tended to make a lot of bad, self-absorbed decisions that rarely helped the people they claimed to be representing.

That didn’t sit well with me either, so I decided to put any thoughts of going into politics on hold until I’d actually had a life and possibly a real career, and I spent the next couple of years drifting between a series of random yet educational jobs (debt collector, deliveryman, computer salesman, repo man, dairy worker) that taught me the value of hard work, personal responsibility and the financial benefits of dining at Taco John’s on Tuesday nights (2 tacos for a buck) when money got tight.

After awhile, however, the desire to see the world (and the need for a more consistent and slightly larger paycheck) convinced me to join the Army, where I spent ten years traveling around the world on the government dime working as an intelligence analyst. I generally enjoyed my time in the military, despite the aforementioned problem with authority (which wasn’t as much of an issue in the military as many people might think it would be), and I got to see that the decisions our political leaders make were sometimes frivolous, often ill-informed, and always had unforeseen repercussions down the road…especially on the soldiers tasked with implementing those decisions. I was fortunate enough to spend most of my 10 years in the military doing jobs I enjoyed, traveling to countries that I always wanted to see (Scotland is the greatest place in the world to hang out, Afghanistan is very underrated) and working with people I liked and respected, until I finally decided that at 35 it was time to move into a job where I didn’t have the threat of relocation lying over my head every two or three years, where I didn’t have to worry about my friends being blown up, and where I didn’t have to work in any capacity for George W. Bush.

I work now for a trust company in Kansas where I’m responsible for overseeing, pricing and maintaining farms, commercial and residential properties, mineral assets, insurance policies, annuities, etc. In my spare time I like to read books on economics, history, and politics (I’m preparing to tackle Murray Rothbard’s “Man, Economy & State” and Von Mises’ “Human Action”…should take me about a year at the rate I’m currently finishing books), watch movies, and destroy posers on “Halo 3″ (where I’m signed in under “UCrawford” for anyone interested in taking a shot at me some time). I used to play rugby until age, inconsistent conditioning, and a string of gradually worsening injuries finally convinced me to quit. I’m a rabid fan of the Kansas Jayhawks in general and their basketball and football programs in particular and I’m also a devoted fan of the Kansas City Chiefs and Royals. I’m also fond of going online and debating/picking fights with people on the merits of the philosophy of individual freedom…sometimes to the point of being an asshole (but hopefully a reasonably well-informed asshole). I’ve been a big fan of The Liberty Papers ever since finding it online, I respect the body of work they’ve put out, and I’m honored that Brad Warbiany invited me to join his jolly band of freedom fighters. So cheers, Brad, and to everyone else I look forward to reaching consensus or locking horns with you in the near future.

Posted By: UCrawford @ 12:23 am || Permalink || Comments (7) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Admin,The Contributors
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August 19, 2007

500,000

Just before midnight on August 19th, The Liberty Papers had its 500,000th visitor as registered by Sitemeter.

Not too bad, considering that we hit 100,000 back on January 27th, and hit 200,000 on March 19th . and a quarter million on  April 10th.

On behalf of my fellow contributors, I’d like to thank everyone who has read what we’ve written, whether you agree with it or not. We’re not here to promote any agenda other than the agenda of freedom, and open debate is always welcome.

Posted By: Doug Mataconis @ 11:03 pm || Permalink || Comments (7) || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
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August 9, 2007

Congratulations

A brief pause from politics to congratulate fellow Liberty Papers Contributor Brad Warbiany and his wife Joanna on the birth of their son.

Congratulations Brad !

Posted By: Doug Mataconis @ 7:32 am || Permalink || Comments (4) || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
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June 9, 2007

Free Leonard Peltier Paris Now!

I don’t care for Paris Hilton. In fact, whether or not she goes to jail means nothing to me. I’m not even going to use it as an excuse to argue about the validity of DUI laws or the travesties of our justice system. I wish this whole sordid detail would be relegated to the E! channel and the metro section of the paper, not CNN and the front page.

However, I am an opportunist, and I will gladly and shamelessly self-promote anything which might make me a buck. So head on over to my wife’s cafepress store and buy stuff!

The shirts (front & back, multiple shirt styles):

And in true Paris Hilton fashion, a dog shirt and trucker hat…

Yes, this post has no real place at The Liberty Papers. That’s where the whole “shameless self-promotion” thing comes from…

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 12:44 pm || Permalink || Comments Off || TrackBack URI || Categories: Crime and Punishment,Humor,Media,The Contributors
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April 19, 2007

Anarcho-whatism?

I want to thank Brad and the other contributors for inviting me to join their revolution. It is my hope to co-opt their broadly-based revolution so that I can impose my vision of an anarchic paradise, kind of like Castro and the Ayatollah Khomeini, but without the murders, beatings and prison camps. Essentially, I seek to convince everyone that freedom is a good idea, and that central planning or coercive imposed monopolies are bad ones.

Often when I tell someone for the first time that I am an anarchist, they get this scared look. I routinely have to explain that I am not one of those anarchists who march down streets waving paper-mache puppets, smashing store front windows and throwing home-made bombs while demanding free health care.

So what is anarcho-capitalism? It is a form of extremism. Walter Block describes the heart of free-market anarchism as the principle of “free trade between consenting adults”. I actually prefer the term free-market anarchism because the word “capitalism” was coined by Marx to denigrate free trade. Essentially, the free-market anarchist believes that society should be organized such that the peaceful use of one’s property, and the peaceful interactions between people should not be interfered with.

Why is it anarchic? Because the state is, at its heart, incompatible with this principle. The tax collector gets his money not by persuading a person to give it to him of their own free will, but by threat of violence. The state also quashes competition callling it “invasion” or “vigilantism” depending on the character of the competition.

There is a large body of work available on the web which discusses and describes the various flavors free-market anarchism. I particularly recommend praxeology.net. In the coming months, will be discussing some of those essays, as well as the free-market anarchist’s perspective on current events.

As to myself, I am nearly 37 years old. I am married with two children who are 6 and 2 years old. I am a computer programmer who is trying to start his own consulting business. I live just west of Boston.

I have an unusual history: I was born in Turkey to an American mother and Turkish father. When I was 7 years old, my father sent the rest of our family to the U.S. while he worked to purge the Grey Wolves (a fascist paramilitary group) from his university.

I grew up a few miles away from Lexington green, steeped in the culture of the American Revolution. I was a computer and science nerd growing up, but had a classical education rammed down my throat, including 7 years of Latin. My teenage years were spent reading Heinlein, Niven, Livy, Julius Caesar, Horace, Pliny, Herodotus et al.

I spent 5 years in the U.S. Navy, most of them as an nuclear propulsion officer on the U.S.S. Abraham Lincoln.

Posted By: tarran @ 12:09 am || Permalink || Comments (7) || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
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