Thoughts, essays, and writings on Liberty. Written by the heirs of Patrick Henry.

May 21, 2008

The Liberty Papers to Cover the National Convention in Denver

The Libertarian Convention of course! Which convention did you think I was talking about? The Libertarian National Convention will run this Memorial Day weekend beginning on Thursday, May 22nd and ending on Monday, May 26th. I plan on attending the convention representing The Liberty Papers as a citizen journalist on Saturday, Sunday, and possibly Monday.

My press pass will give me the same access as the MSM outlets (though some events will be reserved for “invited media only”). The events which I believe I will be able to get into include the platform debate, the presidential debate, national chairs debate, presidential nominating speeches, presidential election roll call with acceptance speech, the first press conference with the LP Presidential Nominee, and much, much more.

Fellow Liberty Papers contributor Jason Pye will also be attending the convention as a delegate.

Usually, The Liberty Papers does not have a great deal of activity on the weekends as far as posts are concerned but this weekend will be much different. Expect periodic reporting from the convention beginning Saturday. I’m going to try to score some high profile interviews, will post lots of photos, and possibly post some video for your consumption.

It’s my goal to bring the convention to The Liberty Papers’ reader. Any suggestions for what you would like me to cover, who I interview, and what questions you would like me to ask would be greatly appreciated!

**UPDATE** Jason Pye will also be adding content to The Liberty Papers throughout the weekend:

I am taking a video camera and a laptop and will be updating daily both here and The Liberty Papers. You may even see a post or two over at Red State.

There will be a few battles between moderates and anarchists, mainly over the platform and Bob Barr. Over a beer not too long ago, I told Daniel Adams, chairman of the Libertarian Party of Georgia, that I expected a walkout of different factions at some point during the convention.

Pye has much more insight to the inner workings of the Libertarian Party than I do, so I think his take on the event will be very interesting. Between the two of us, I think we will have the convention covered quite well.

• • •

January 23, 2008

Quincy’s Back!

Back in the early days of The Liberty Papers, one of the founding contributors was Quincy. Life interceded into his desire to blog, and he eventually took an unspecified hiatus from the blogosphere.

Thankfully, he’s back!

Head on over and see what he’s up to.

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 8:04 pm || Permalink || Comments (1) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Blog Discussions,Blogroll,The Contributors
• • •

November 22, 2007

Have A Great Thanksgiving!

Life should be slightly quiet here over the next few days, as a couple of us may be attending to familial obligations. In the interim, we wish you and yours a happy holiday, and we’ll get back to battling the evil forces of government after the turkey hangover subsides!

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 6:00 am || Permalink || Comments (1) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Admin,The Contributors
• • •

November 10, 2007

The Georgia Porkbuster

Fellow Liberty Papers Contributor Jason Pye is featured in a report from WSB-TV in Atlanta on the fight against pork in the Peach State:

Way to go Jason !

Posted By: Doug Mataconis @ 7:09 am || Permalink || Comments Off || TrackBack URI || Categories: Government Waste,The Contributors
• • •

November 5, 2007

Monday Open Thread — Hard Cases Edition

Doug recently posted a “Libertarian Hard Cases” thread about how to deal with issues related to children. Libertarianism is one of the few political systems that treats adults like adults and holds them responsible for their actions; it assumes that people are rational actors who are capable of making decisions in their own life and deserve rights commensurate with that ability. But it has difficulty answering questions regarding people who are not capable of making those decisions and cannot be trusted with the rights to do so, such as children and the mentally disabled.

Undoubtedly, there are many other libertarian hard cases. So this thread is a call to the readers here to give us ideas. What libertarian “hard cases” would you like to see addressed?

For example, I’ll be writing a post soon regarding the rights of parents to choose to vaccinate or not vaccinate children. There are two clear questions that arise:

1) As a parent, do I have the right to not vaccinate, which is a choice that some would consider tantamount to abuse or neglect of a child, if I believe that the potential harm of a vaccine is worse than the disease it is preventing against (such as chicken pox)?
2) Does society as a whole have a legitimate claim to supersede my right to choose not to vaccinate, as it creates an externality that increases the likelihood that we see an outbreak of vaccine-preventable diseases?

These are difficult questions, and ones that I think may result in disagreements within the contributors here, so it could lead to some interesting fireworks. If you have any suggested topics, let us know.

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 7:53 am || Permalink || Comments (13) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Blog Discussions,Open Thread,The Contributors
• • •

October 8, 2007

A Little Bit About UCrawford

I suppose the best way to describe myself would be to say that I have a problem with authority. I’ve always disliked when people told me what to do, even as a young child, and I’ve always preferred to find my own path through life and make my own decisions, even if it occasionally went against the conventional wisdom and sometimes worked to my short-term disadvantage. My dad said I inherited it from him, but that I’ve taken it to a whole new level. When I was young I wanted to be a journalist, until I got to college and realized that journalism was less about the search for objective truth than it was about writing the stories that best suited your employer’s interests, whether they were true or not (which didn’t sit well with me at all). So I drifted aimlessly through a couple of years of college as an indifferent (often drunk) student, unsure of what to do with myself until one of my fraternity brothers gave me a copy of “The Fountainhead” and I got hooked on the ideas that success and a refusal to conform to societal standards were not mutally exclusive, and that the greatest evil in the world was society and government’s failure to recognize or accept individuality and individual freedom as a strength, not a weakness. So I threw myself into studying politics and history, worked in a few political campaigns after college, had some success, and thought about doing a career in politics until I realized that most of the people I knew who had never had a career outside of politics had no comprehension of how the real world actually worked and tended to make a lot of bad, self-absorbed decisions that rarely helped the people they claimed to be representing.

That didn’t sit well with me either, so I decided to put any thoughts of going into politics on hold until I’d actually had a life and possibly a real career, and I spent the next couple of years drifting between a series of random yet educational jobs (debt collector, deliveryman, computer salesman, repo man, dairy worker) that taught me the value of hard work, personal responsibility and the financial benefits of dining at Taco John’s on Tuesday nights (2 tacos for a buck) when money got tight.

After awhile, however, the desire to see the world (and the need for a more consistent and slightly larger paycheck) convinced me to join the Army, where I spent ten years traveling around the world on the government dime working as an intelligence analyst. I generally enjoyed my time in the military, despite the aforementioned problem with authority (which wasn’t as much of an issue in the military as many people might think it would be), and I got to see that the decisions our political leaders make were sometimes frivolous, often ill-informed, and always had unforeseen repercussions down the road…especially on the soldiers tasked with implementing those decisions. I was fortunate enough to spend most of my 10 years in the military doing jobs I enjoyed, traveling to countries that I always wanted to see (Scotland is the greatest place in the world to hang out, Afghanistan is very underrated) and working with people I liked and respected, until I finally decided that at 35 it was time to move into a job where I didn’t have the threat of relocation lying over my head every two or three years, where I didn’t have to worry about my friends being blown up, and where I didn’t have to work in any capacity for George W. Bush.

I work now for a trust company in Kansas where I’m responsible for overseeing, pricing and maintaining farms, commercial and residential properties, mineral assets, insurance policies, annuities, etc. In my spare time I like to read books on economics, history, and politics (I’m preparing to tackle Murray Rothbard’s “Man, Economy & State” and Von Mises’ “Human Action”…should take me about a year at the rate I’m currently finishing books), watch movies, and destroy posers on “Halo 3″ (where I’m signed in under “UCrawford” for anyone interested in taking a shot at me some time). I used to play rugby until age, inconsistent conditioning, and a string of gradually worsening injuries finally convinced me to quit. I’m a rabid fan of the Kansas Jayhawks in general and their basketball and football programs in particular and I’m also a devoted fan of the Kansas City Chiefs and Royals. I’m also fond of going online and debating/picking fights with people on the merits of the philosophy of individual freedom…sometimes to the point of being an asshole (but hopefully a reasonably well-informed asshole). I’ve been a big fan of The Liberty Papers ever since finding it online, I respect the body of work they’ve put out, and I’m honored that Brad Warbiany invited me to join his jolly band of freedom fighters. So cheers, Brad, and to everyone else I look forward to reaching consensus or locking horns with you in the near future.

Posted By: UCrawford @ 12:23 am || Permalink || Comments (7) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Admin,The Contributors
• • •

August 19, 2007

500,000

Just before midnight on August 19th, The Liberty Papers had its 500,000th visitor as registered by Sitemeter.

Not too bad, considering that we hit 100,000 back on January 27th, and hit 200,000 on March 19th . and a quarter million on  April 10th.

On behalf of my fellow contributors, I’d like to thank everyone who has read what we’ve written, whether you agree with it or not. We’re not here to promote any agenda other than the agenda of freedom, and open debate is always welcome.

Posted By: Doug Mataconis @ 11:03 pm || Permalink || Comments (7) || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
• • •

August 9, 2007

Congratulations

A brief pause from politics to congratulate fellow Liberty Papers Contributor Brad Warbiany and his wife Joanna on the birth of their son.

Congratulations Brad !

Posted By: Doug Mataconis @ 7:32 am || Permalink || Comments (4) || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
• • •

June 9, 2007

Free Leonard Peltier Paris Now!

I don’t care for Paris Hilton. In fact, whether or not she goes to jail means nothing to me. I’m not even going to use it as an excuse to argue about the validity of DUI laws or the travesties of our justice system. I wish this whole sordid detail would be relegated to the E! channel and the metro section of the paper, not CNN and the front page.

However, I am an opportunist, and I will gladly and shamelessly self-promote anything which might make me a buck. So head on over to my wife’s cafepress store and buy stuff!

The shirts (front & back, multiple shirt styles):

And in true Paris Hilton fashion, a dog shirt and trucker hat…

Yes, this post has no real place at The Liberty Papers. That’s where the whole “shameless self-promotion” thing comes from…

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 12:44 pm || Permalink || Comments Off || TrackBack URI || Categories: Crime and Punishment,Humor,Media,The Contributors
• • •

April 19, 2007

Anarcho-whatism?

I want to thank Brad and the other contributors for inviting me to join their revolution. It is my hope to co-opt their broadly-based revolution so that I can impose my vision of an anarchic paradise, kind of like Castro and the Ayatollah Khomeini, but without the murders, beatings and prison camps. Essentially, I seek to convince everyone that freedom is a good idea, and that central planning or coercive imposed monopolies are bad ones.

Often when I tell someone for the first time that I am an anarchist, they get this scared look. I routinely have to explain that I am not one of those anarchists who march down streets waving paper-mache puppets, smashing store front windows and throwing home-made bombs while demanding free health care.

So what is anarcho-capitalism? It is a form of extremism. Walter Block describes the heart of free-market anarchism as the principle of “free trade between consenting adults”. I actually prefer the term free-market anarchism because the word “capitalism” was coined by Marx to denigrate free trade. Essentially, the free-market anarchist believes that society should be organized such that the peaceful use of one’s property, and the peaceful interactions between people should not be interfered with.

Why is it anarchic? Because the state is, at its heart, incompatible with this principle. The tax collector gets his money not by persuading a person to give it to him of their own free will, but by threat of violence. The state also quashes competition callling it “invasion” or “vigilantism” depending on the character of the competition.

There is a large body of work available on the web which discusses and describes the various flavors free-market anarchism. I particularly recommend praxeology.net. In the coming months, will be discussing some of those essays, as well as the free-market anarchist’s perspective on current events.

As to myself, I am nearly 37 years old. I am married with two children who are 6 and 2 years old. I am a computer programmer who is trying to start his own consulting business. I live just west of Boston.

I have an unusual history: I was born in Turkey to an American mother and Turkish father. When I was 7 years old, my father sent the rest of our family to the U.S. while he worked to purge the Grey Wolves (a fascist paramilitary group) from his university.

I grew up a few miles away from Lexington green, steeped in the culture of the American Revolution. I was a computer and science nerd growing up, but had a classical education rammed down my throat, including 7 years of Latin. My teenage years were spent reading Heinlein, Niven, Livy, Julius Caesar, Horace, Pliny, Herodotus et al.

I spent 5 years in the U.S. Navy, most of them as an nuclear propulsion officer on the U.S.S. Abraham Lincoln.

Posted By: tarran @ 12:09 am || Permalink || Comments (7) || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
• • •

April 18, 2007

Welcoming A New Contributor

I’d like to give a hearty welcome to tarran, our newest contributor.

As the site has expanded, we have realized that we’d like to offer content from the full spectrum of the pro-liberty movement. On the upper bound, this would be the libertarians who simply believe that our federal government is too large and want to return to a Constitutional, federalist system. There are several contributors here who head up to the upper bound of that spectrum. On the absolute lowest bound is anarcho-capitalism, and we have had no contributor that officially takes that title. Tarran is a self-described anarcho-capitalist, and will offer that point of view.

When the time comes that we start really getting into the Point/Counterpoint debates, and in general, this could lead to some rather interesting discussions. So say welcome to our newest contributor, tarran, who will be putting up his introductory post shortly.

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 1:58 pm || Permalink || Comments (2) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Admin,The Contributors
• • •

April 10, 2007

A Quarter Million

Earlier this afternoon, The Liberty Papers had its 250,000th visitor. That’s a quarter of a million visitors to this blog since we started back in November 2005. Thanks to everyone who’s stopped by and to my fellow contributors who’ve helped turn this place into something that people are noticing.

Related Posts:

200,000
100,000

Posted By: Doug Mataconis @ 12:59 pm || Permalink || Comments Off || TrackBack URI || Categories: Admin,The Contributors
• • •

March 26, 2007

The Web As Collective Property

Last night, in a comment to Jason’s post on Venezuela & “collective property”, I suggested that the Pilgrims showed that collective property doesn’t work. As I was listening this morning to an EconTalk podcast, the discussion turned to the web, and how the web has grown into an enormous community, largely due to the people who wish to put out information, not a profit motive.

It occurred to me that such an idea may be used by socialists as a defense of collective property. After all, you see an enormous– largely free– medium, where the work of individuals has put together an enormous wealth of information. They may claim that something like Blogger or geocities is an example of how collective property (i.e. a free “printing press” for anyone to publish upon) has enabled an amazing increase in available information that we see throughout online society.

On its face, it sounds like a pretty reasonable claim. However, it fails to take into account the difference between “freely-provided and open to all” and “collective”. Take, for example, the Blogger service. It’s owned by Google, and as with most things that Google does, they provide the hosting forum for free to whoever wants to set up a blog. One of the advantages to a non-physical realm like the Internet is that there is a near-infinite amount of “space” to offer up. Google provides space to whoever wants it, and the act of using that space has made the internet a richer place.

But that doesn’t mean that it’s “collective property”. While Google offers Blogger blogs to anyone who wants one, that doesn’t make those blogs collectively owned or governed. The blogs are more of a “homesteading” situation than collective property. Someone makes a claim to a certain URL within the blogspot.com domain, sets up their blog, and thereafter they are the owner of that space.

Collective property doesn’t work because of the tragedy of the commons. As an example, let’s say that Google put into the terms of service that if you set up a blog within Blogger, you have to allow anyone to contribute posts to it. Thereafter, every blog on Blogger would truly be collective property. I predict that within a few months, Blogger would cease to exist. While a free blog on Blogger may not seem like “property”, it certainly feels like property to those who have one. The people who have those blogs talk about “my” blog or “our” blog (if it is a group blog like this one), not a blog belonging to “the community”.

A similar issue is currently occurring with Wikipedia. Wikipedia is truly a commons, where anyone has the ability to edit entries on any subject, without consideration to the credentials of those who make the edits. At the beginning, Wikipedia was fairly reliable. Over time, though, Wikipedia has proven to be a completely unreliable source of information. When you’re looking up information on a topic even remotely political, Wikipedia is a source that must be corroborated by multiple other sources before it should be trusted. The reason is that Wikipedia’s design as a commons ensures that the topics it covers may be more exhaustive than other encyclopedias, but it cannot claim any reasonable expectation of accuracy. Such a tendency to put out false information is almost expected on a topic of political significance, or anything controversial, but as Sean Lynch of Catallarchy pointed out, this is the case even on such non-controversial topics as the storage of hydrogen peroxide. The advantage of a commons like Wikipedia is that everyone can use it. The disadvantage of a commons like Wikipedia is that you can’t trust people to use it wisely.

The difference between a commons and private property is profound. Property is a very real, human idea. Whether that property is a house, a car, a stereo, or a blog, there is a human desire to control that which is “mine”. There is further a human desire to protect that property from the control of others. When that property cannot be defended, the property becomes worthless.

If tomorrow, the government told me that I had to open my house or my car to let anyone in the community use it as they pleased, I would expect that my house and car would rapidly deteriorate, because there would be no incentive for the people who use it to contribute to its upkeep. Likewise, if tomorrow the government declared that I had to open The Liberty Papers to anyone who wished to post to the front page, you can be sure that The Liberty Papers would deteriorate. The contributors who were first invited to this blog when Eric started it 18 months ago were chosen because they shared a common political outlook, and because Eric believed that they would add to a richer blog. Those who we invited (“we”, because while this blog may have one legal owner, we share decision-making amongst the group) after I took over for Eric were invited for the same reason. If we were forced to allow anyone to post here, it would cease to be The Liberty Papers, as the new contributors would not be “selected” in order to provide a libertarian message. It might become, based on some of our recent comments, the “We Love Hugo Chavez Papers”. At that point, you can be sure that pretty much all of the original contributors would stop caring and stop contributing. And you can be sure that we contributors wouldn’t be willing to put up money for hosting costs to espouse a political ideology on “our” blog that goes against our own beliefs.

Humans have amazing capacities and desire for creativity. Some may think that some of the pages on the web are designed for others, but I would say that this is not the case. For example, I regularly check out beeradvocate.com. This is a site devoted to all things beer. Now, some may suggest that it was created by the Alstrom brothers in order to give a beer-related web site to the world. I don’t agree. I think it was created by two brothers who love beer and wanted to build something. It wasn’t so much about giving something to beer drinkers worldwide, so much that it was about creating something they were interested in and could call their own. If, again, the government said that they must open the inner workings of their site to anyone who wanted to control it, I think they would be forced to throw up their hands and stop caring, because the work that they created out of love and interest for beer would cease to be what they wanted it to be.

The web has become the wonderful collection of information and communication because people have a desire to create and build, not a desire to donate. When you take away the ownership, the ability to control what you’ve built, you take away the incentive to build. This isn’t like building a home and selling it to someone, there’s not a lot of money to be earned by building the average blog or web site. Most people in this world build what they want to build because they love to do it. You take away a person’s ability to control their creation, and they will cease to build. Some would say that the world would be a better place if this were not the case, but those people are tilting at windmills. Human nature and private property rights are inextricably linked. When you try to break that link, bad things happen. And, like Venezuela under a “collective property” arrangement, we’d all be poorer if the Web was collective property.

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 8:12 pm || Permalink || Comments (8) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Property Rights,Socialism,The Contributors,Theory and Ideas
• • •

March 19, 2007

200,000

Within the last few minutes, the 200,000th unique visitor as recorded by Sitemeter passed through The Liberty Papers. We reached the 100,000 mark on January 23, 2007 and it took about 428 days of posting to get that far. In other words, in the past 55 days, we’ve had as many visitors as we did during the first 14 months of existence.

The one thing I attribute that to is the great group of contributors that we’ve got here, and the great job they’ve all done in posting things that people want to read, even when it causes no small degree of controversy.

We’ve been having some discussions about where to take The Liberty Papers next, so keep an eye out for what will hopefully be some exciting additions. The great writing will still be here, of course, but we’re hoping to bring some new things that will keep all you new readers coming back for more.

And that, is where I’d like to end this little bit of self-congratulation. If you’ve found this site thanks to a link from Reddit, or Google News, or anyplace else for that matter. Stick around and read what else we’ve got here, and come back often because there’s more to come.

Related Posts:

100,000

Posted By: Doug Mataconis @ 6:38 pm || Permalink || Comments (2) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Admin,The Contributors
• • •

January 23, 2007

100,000

According to Sitemeter, The Liberty Papers crossed the 100,000 mark as far as unique visits today. It’s quite a milestone, especially considering that over 40,000 of those visits occurred in the last two months.

I’d like to thank the contributors here, who have turned a blog that was fairly inactive a few months ago into a very vibrant site. I’d also like to thank all those who come here to read and comment, as some of the discussions generated have been quite interesting.

2007 should mean big things here, so stick around!

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 8:47 am || Permalink || Comments (3) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Admin,The Contributors
• • •

December 24, 2006

Christmas Day Post

The contributors would like to wish all of our readers a Happy Holidays and a Merry Christmas.

Posted By: Kevin Boyd @ 11:07 pm || Permalink || Comments Off || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
• • •

December 3, 2006

Liberty Slate 2008

If you have been reading this blog for quite some time, you’ll know that we’re not exactly big fans of the Republican party in its current state. We think they’re for big government, that they are hypocrites on free trade, and that they don’t realize how out of touch they are with limited-government voters.

However, I would like to break the news on this blog about an effort by libertarian and small government conservative Republican activists to take back OUR party from the big government conservatives who run it. The effort is called LibertySlate08. The purpose of the project is to find and recruit at least 12 candidates to challenge big government Republican incumbents in the Republican primaries in 2008. Some of the main issues being championed are a return to fiscal discipline, term limits for Congressmen, opposition to the draft, and an end to war in Iraq (although I don’t see the latter two being serious issues in 2008).

For full disclosure, I am involved in this project and I have applied to be one of the project’s bloggers.

Right now, we are identifying possible Republican incumbants to challenge and we are already beginning to recruit candidates to take them on. What we need right now are the following:

1) People who are willing to take on these entrenched incumbants.
2) People who are willing to work on the campaigns for the people we have recruited in any capacity from campaign manager on down.
3) Someone who can design and build a website for cheap.
4) Any suggestions for what you can do to help this project along.

The time to take back our party is in 2008. We have the plan to do it, now join us. I will be keeping you informed over the next two years with updates and plans for how we’re going to do this. Hopefully, I will also be giving you some candidate profiles and about the men and women who already have and will step up to challenge these entrenched big government incumbants.

Posted By: Kevin Boyd @ 10:48 am || Permalink || Comments (2) || TrackBack URI || Categories: Politics,The Contributors
• • •

November 22, 2006

Hello all…

First let me say thanks to Brad for allowing me to post here. This is a blog that has been a regular read for me for a several months now and I’m honored to be given the privilege to post here.

As Brad has said, I have my own site, JasonPye.com, which is a blog which is generally focused on my home county and Georgia politics. I live in a very “red” county and my blog has become a source of news to my community, so it’s hard for me to get into libertarian and capitalist philosophy. I also contribute to Peach Pundit, a blog dedicated to Georgia politics.

I look forward to posting here so I can get more into libertarian philosophy in current events.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I must go watch the third season of Bullshit! that came in the mail today.

Posted By: Jason Pye @ 12:30 pm || Permalink || Comments Off || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
• • •

Comrades, I Hereby Declare the Revolution

A revolution? Comrades? But this is a classic liberal blog, isn’t it? In a word, yes. And it will remain so. I use the word “comrade” in it’s older sense, not the socialist meaning of egalitarianism and absolute equality of class, but in the fraternal sense. We are comrades, brothers and sisters seeking liberty.

But, a revolution? Yes, a revolution. Not a violent one, I don’t advocate that. A revolution in thought, a continuation of the Liberal revolution that began in Scotland nearly 300 years ago.

Who am I and why am I posting here? You may recognize the name and the quote that I chose to introduce myself with. Like Heinlein’s celebrated novel, “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress”, I am a construct, a false front. This is a nom de guerre, appropriate to a revolutionary. I’m a concerned citizen, a believer in liberty, a classic liberal following in the footsteps of giants. Men like Adam Smith, Thomas Paine, and Milton Friedman. I have no illusions that I am their equal, that I will start revolutions in thought and theory on par with theirs. Perhaps, though, I can sway one of you out there to see the value of liberty and the danger of collectivism. And you can touch one person yourself. And so on. And we change some portion of the world.

So, citizens, lend me your ears, for I have things to say, things I hold dear. Things of deep importance if we are to retain those small amounts of liberty that our masters in Washington have decided are meet for us to keep. I intend to share my thoughts on the nature of the individual, the society, the government, the rights of man. And we will see if I can change the world in some small way.

p.s. You might want to keep an eye out for my pal Simon Jester, I hear he may get into the swing again as well.

Posted By: Adam Selene @ 12:18 pm || Permalink || Comments (3) || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
• • •

Announcements

All,

I’d like to welcome two new contributors to The Liberty Papers. The first is Jason Pye, who currently hosts his own blog, and will now be contributing here. The other is Adam Selene, who does not currently have a personal blog, but has been around the blogosphere for a while and will be an excellent addition. So to the both of you, welcome!

UPDATE: One more to come… Simon Jester will be joining us soon.

Posted By: Brad Warbiany @ 11:41 am || Permalink || Comments (3) || TrackBack URI || Categories: The Contributors
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